• Compliments, Pick-up Lines, Rejections

    Compliments, Pick-up Lines, Rejections

    While Japanese does have its rabu rabu no kotoba (lovey-dovey words) like “Kimi no koto ga suki de tamaranai” (“I adore you”), and “Watashi no isshoo no koibito” (“You are the love of my life”), culturally, those are not used all that often. Showing your appreciation for your ai suru hito (loved one) through actions [&hellip

    By kansaiscene

  • Get on the right track!

    Get on the right track!

    Riding trains in Japan can be tricky at times: not only do you need to figure out the fastest/cheapest/nicest way to get there while navigating multiple train companies, but often the nomenclature for the different types of trains changes from company to company. The fastest of all is the JR Shinkansen (新幹線) which links major [&hellip

    By Jean-Yves Terreault

  • How was your Golden Week?

    How was your Golden Week?

    The Japanese Golden Week falls around the end of April and beginning of May every year where there is cluster of national holidays during this time

    By kansaiscene

  • Fair play!

    Fair play!

    If sumo, cosplay, or hina dolls aren’t your thing, why not get in on the craic (kurakku) this month and celebrate one of March’s most internationally renowned festivals – St Patrick’s day! Thursday the 17th will once again bring to Kansai an explosion of rainbows (niji), shamrocks (shamurokku), and leprechauns (repurakoun), and beer (biiru), Guinness [&hellip

    By kansaiscene

Language

  • Compliments, Pick-up Lines, Rejections

    By: kansaiscene • In: Language • On: Feb 10, 2017

    Compliments, Pick-up Lines, Rejections

    While Japanese does have its rabu rabu no kotoba (lovey-dovey words) like “Kimi no koto ga suki de tamaranai” (“I adore you”), and “Watashi no isshoo no koibito” (“You are the love of my life”), culturally, those are not used all that often. Showing your appreciation for your ai suru hito (loved one) through actions rather than words often seems to be the more favorable approach. If you’re lucky enough to have already met your unmei no hito (soul mate), good for you! But if you’re looking for love or a Valentine’s date this month,

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  • Wet Your Whistle

    By: kansaiscene • In: Language • On: Sep 05, 2016

    A trip to the Yamazaki whisky distillery is a great opportunity to practice your Japanese! You’ll have English audio guides for the tour but when you get to the really good part (the samples and whisky library at the end!) it’ll be time to whip out your best nihongo. First thing’s first, you’ll need to say if you like it neat (sutoreto de), on the rocks (rokku de), or with soda (souda wari). If you’re not a whisky fan, but have been dragged along for the ride, you could ask to see if they have

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  • At the Airport

    By: kansaiscene • In: Language • On: Aug 04, 2016

    If you’re traveling by air in Japan this summer, you’ll need to know what to say at the airport (kuukou) in Japanese. Want to request a window seat (mado gawa no seki) or an aisle seat (tsuuro gawa no seki)? Want to know what the food situation on the plane is? Not sure what to say if your checked luggage doesn’t come out (besides mendokusai! – “What a hassle!”)? We’ve got it covered. Study these phrases below and it’ll be smooth sailing right from the departure hall (shuppatsu robii), on the flight (furaito), through to

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  • Get on the right track!

    By: Jean-Yves Terreault • In: Language • On: Jun 05, 2016

    Get on the right track!

    Riding trains in Japan can be tricky at times: not only do you need to figure out the fastest/cheapest/nicest way to get there while navigating multiple train companies, but often the nomenclature for the different types of trains changes from company to company. The fastest of all is the JR Shinkansen (新幹線) which links major cities of Japan from Sakuranomiya in Kyuushu to Sapporo in Hokkaido. Nozomi (のぞみ), Hikari (ひかり) and Kodama (こだま) are from fastest to slowest. JR Rail Passes for visitors do not allow travel on the Nozomi. For most local transportation, people

    Read More »
  • How was your Golden Week?

    By: kansaiscene • In: Language • On: May 04, 2016

    How was your Golden Week?

    The Japanese Golden Week falls around the end of April and beginning of May every year where there is cluster of national holidays during this time

    Read More »
  • Chatter by the Cherry Tree

    By: kansaiscene • In: Language • On: Apr 07, 2016

    Ohanami (cherry-blossom picnic) season is now in full swing!

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  • Fair play!

    By: kansaiscene • In: Language • On: Mar 07, 2016

    Fair play!

    If sumo, cosplay, or hina dolls aren’t your thing, why not get in on the craic (kurakku) this month and celebrate one of March’s most internationally renowned festivals – St Patrick’s day! Thursday the 17th will once again bring to Kansai an explosion of rainbows (niji), shamrocks (shamurokku), and leprechauns (repurakoun), and beer (biiru), Guinness (ginesu), and cider (saidaa) drinkers will be out in all their green glory! Start with Thursday-night drinks at your nearest Irish pub and carry the shenanigans all the way through to the weekend! May the luck of the Irish be

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  • Confess Your Love!

    By: kansaiscene • In: Language • On: Feb 04, 2016

    If you’re planning to ask out a special Japanese someone this Valentine’s Day (barentaindee; バレンタインデー), as in start a more serious relationship, it’s important you understand kokuhaku (告白), the nerve-racking custom of confessing one’s love. Kokuhaku literally means “confession,” and is done when a man or a woman declares their love to another in the hopes of starting to date that person, and begin a romantic relationship. Everything starts from the act kokuhaku, and not much, besides fairly platonic friendship, usually happens before it. The most basic way of confessing this is to say, “Sukidesu.Tsukiattekudasai.”

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  • What’s in the Bento Box?

    By: kansaiscene • In: Language • On: Jan 10, 2016

    ‘Tis the season to be jolly, and if you’re lucky enough to have been invited into a Japanese home to celebrate the New Year, you’re in for a real treat. Forget everything you might be used to eating at this time of year, shougatsu (New Year) in Japan will have your tastebuds talking about a totally different kind of culinary delight. Osechi ryouri, special New Year’s food, comes in the form of the fanciest bento (lunch box) you will ever see. The three-tiered boxes are known as jubako, and stack together neatly in the same

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  • Word Zen

    By: kansaiscene • In: Language • On: Nov 16, 2015

    In Japanese, there are several key concepts, often related to Buddhism, that appear and reappear when we learn about training in martial arts 武道 (budo), artistic endeavours such as shodo 書道 (calligraphy) and ikebana 生け花 (flower arrangement), and other practices that require discipline, perseverance, and contemplation, such as meditation 瞑想 (meisou). These concepts are very deep, can seem ambiguous, and can be tricky to translate into English. Below are a few that appeared in this month’s cover feature (see page 10) on the internationally renowned gardener Yasuo Kitayama. Useful Expressions ROMAJI KANJI MEANING Sempai 先輩

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